Events & Services

Summer 2024 Events

Saturdays at 12 p.m. ET. More information and registration.

USING GREEK AND LATIN WORD ROOTS TO BUILD LITERACY
JUNE 20

CLASSICAL FESTIVAL
JUNE 23

INFORMATION SESSION
JULY 11

More information and registration.

Fall 2024

ANCIENT GREECE IN TRANSLATION
SEPTEMBER 30 (Antigone’s defense in Antigone)
OCTOBER 7 (Odysseus’ encounter with the sirens in the Odyssey)
OCTOBER 14 (Andromache and Hector’s exchange in the iliad)
OCTOBER 21 (Herodotus and Thucydides on the purpose of inquiry)
OCTOBER 28 (Plato and Aristotle’s distinctions between poetry, philosophy, and inquiry)

ANCIENT GREECE IN THE MODERN WORLD
NOVEMBER 4 (Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie)
NOVEMBER 11 (The Story of Your Life by Ted Chiang)
NOVEMBER 18 (Glorious Exploits by Ferdia Lennon)
DECEMBER 2 (Piranesi by Susanna Clarke)
DECEMBER 9 (Country by Michael Hughes)

NONFICTION BOOK CLUB
SEPTEMBER 29 (Gods and Robots by Adrienne Mayor)
OCTOBER 27 (24-Hours in Ancient Athens by Philip Matyszak)
NOVEMBER 24 (A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum by Emma Southon)
DECEMBER 29 (The Missing Thread by Daisy Dunne)

More information and registration

Consultations. Teachers and schools can contact the Institute via email to set up a time to speak about their community’s particular needs and goals.

Seminars for Libraries. The Institute for Classics Education provides online seminars to introduce library patrons to the classics of ancient Greece in translation. The seminars are hosted by the library, streamed online, and presented by the Institute’s Dr. Allen. More information is here.

Reading recommendations for teachers: translations and analytical works on ancient texts vary significantly. Click here for the Institute’s position on translation and here for overviews of recommended translations for the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Purpose

The ancient classics present a unique opportunity for readers to engage with profoundly foreign contexts and grapple with contrasting worldviews. Reading them can provoke us to recognize and better understand our expectations for literary texts, our aesthetic and moral values, and our most basic assumptions about truth. Yet even in moments when the world they portray can feel most alien, ancient texts can invite a deep sense of recognition of and connection to what it means to be human. 

Embracing ancient texts’ paradoxical elements is among the most challenging aspects of reading them. Cultural and linguistic contexts can enhance our experiences with these texts that can feel at once profoundly familiar and deeply strange. The Institute’s purpose is to provide, for educators and learners who teach and study Homer and ancient Greek classics in translation, a supportive community in which to explore these contexts .

Images of ancient weaving

About

The Institute for Classics Education is a U.S.-based 501(c)3 non-profit. Led by Dr. Eirene Allen, the Institute strives to promote critical thinking skills for the modern world by teaching the classics of ancient Greece. Fundamental to the Institute’s objectives is supporting educators who teach ancient Greek classics in English translation.

Dr. Allen earned her Ph.D from New York University, and she has taught at NYU. She usually leads the Institute’s discussion groups and seminars and is the general editor of the Institute’s publications. Her own blog is here: https://whyhomer.com/

To learn more about the Institute, its services and publications, Contact Us.

Contact Us

Contact Us with Questions or Requests.

Email us at: athena @ classicseducation . com (remove spaces).